17 photos showing the tragic consequences of population growth on the planet

It’s no secret that ruthlessly exploit our planet’s natural resources running at the speed of light. These photos of “The overcrowding, excessive consumption, overproduction” reveal the tragic consequences resulting from population growth in the world. To learn how to change the ecology of the planet, the book tells the scale with the help of pictures and quotes from famous writers, scientists and environmentalists.

1. Waves of debris.
Suprinayya Dede Indonesian surfer catches a wave, but covered in debris from the coast of the island of Java. Java is the world’s most populous island.

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2. Deforestation.
Willamette National Forest in Oregon destroyed 99%

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3. The Yellow River in China.
The river is so polluted that people have to protect themselves from toxic fumes.

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4. Oil wells.
District of California, in which oil is produced since 1899.

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5. Fire on the oil spill site.
Oil fires that followed the disaster of the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

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6. Landscapes of garbage in Bangladesh.

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7. Indonesian forests converted to plantations.

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8.Jungles destroyed de la Amazonia, Brazil

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9. The world’s largest excavator.
Bagger 288 was designed to work in a coal mining in Hambach Tagebau in Germany.

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10. Landfills in Accra, Ghana.
And electronic waste in third world countries.

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11. Populous city of Mexico.
20 million people.

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12. Dead Bird, Midway Island.
He died of what had swallowed … too plastic.

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13. Greenhouses without limits, Almeria, Spain.

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14. Production of oil from tar sands in Alberta. Located in Canada.

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15. Malvidas threat of flooding.
Global warming will lead to flooding of the Maldives 50 years.

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16. World Canrtera, Yakutia.
The diamond mining world’s largest open pit.

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17. Glaciers, Norway.

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